Category Archives: alumni

Klingler ElectroAcoustic Residency: James Andean, Fall 2015


The 2015-16 Klingler ElectroAcoustic Residency (KEAR) congratulates and welcomes its 2015-16 recipients who will work on creative projects in the multi-channel/Ambisonic studio at Bowling Green State University (Ohio USA) during this academic year:

James Andean (Finland) – Fall 2015

Louise Harris (UK) – Spring 2016

The competition received 23 applications from 11 countries including the US, Canada, UK, Argentina, Brazil, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Italy, and Spain. The quality of submissions was very high and the creative and technical ideas inspiring. We thank everyone who proposed so many great projects and wish we could accept them all.

Many thanks to the jury who carefully reviewed all applications:

Adam Basanta – independent sound artist/composer and 2013 KEAR recipient

Manuella Blackburn – Liverpool Hope University, UK

Judith Shatin – University of Virginia, USA

Stay tuned for news about the 2016-17 KEAR opportunity, which will be announced in early 2016. We welcome all applicants who want to explore multi-channel, live performance, and/or Ambisonic projects.

Professor Papanikolaou to present pre-performance lectures at Toledo Opera’s production of Madama Butterfly



Eftychia Papanikolaou, Associate Professor of Musicology, has been invited to present two pre-performance lectures at Toledo Opera’s production of Giacomo Puccini’s Madama Butterfly, Friday, October 2 at 6:30 p.m. and Sunday, October 4 at 1 p.m.

The allure of the East had captivated opera audiences for the better part of the nineteenth century—tales of the Other constructed through European lens offered boundless opportunities for visual splendor and aural opulence. Written at the dawn of the new century, Madama Butterfly (1904) constitutes Giacomo Puccini’s answer to japonisme, the overwhelming fascination with everything Japanese that thrilled Europeans and Americans alike after 1860.

The opera transports us to the exotic world of nineteenth-century Japan and the ill-fated love between a 15-year-old geisha and an American naval officer. The innocent but passionate Cio-Cio-San (Butterfly) marries the conceited Lieutenant Pinkerton, only to be abandoned when he returns to the US. The stereotypical portrayal of the two protagonists gives us a glimpse into the uneasy historical context that surrounded the encounter between East and West. Puccini’s score, peppered with traditional Japanese music he studied while composing the opera, leaves no doubt about the irresistible power of the music to move, surprise and seduce us. It invites us to leave behind our present-day post-colonial anxieties and rather indulge in the emotional cornucopia and dramatic finesse of one of the composer’s finest creations.

Toledo Opera’s Madama Butterfly is a production of the so-called “Brescia version” of May 1904, the revision that Puccini fashioned three months after the disastrous premiere at La Scala. The opera would undergo several more revisions, until its standard version was established in the Paris production of 1906.

Eftychia Papanikolaou, Ph.D.

Bowling Green State University

For more information please visit

BGSU Voice Alumna to make Metropolitan Opera debut


BGSU alumna, soprano Tammie Michelle Bradley, currently resides in Houston, Texas. She was recently selected by Maestro James Levine to become a part of the prestigious Lindemann Young Artist Development Program at the Metropolitan Opera.  The Lindemann Young Artist Development Program was created in 1980 by Maestro Levine to identify and develop extraordinarily talented young singers in the field of opera. The program has trained a new generation of renowned American and International opera singers, as well as coaches and pianists, who perform at the highest standards in productions not only at the Met, but in opera houses around the world.

Ms. Bradley has won prizes in several prestigious vocal competitions, including the first prize in the Marilyn Horne Song Competition at The Music Academy of the West in Santa Barbara, California held last July 2014. She has also won prizes in the Gerda Lissner Vocal Competition in New York City, and the Lois Alba Vocal Competition in Houston, Texas.  She is currently performing a recital tour of the U.S. as winner of the Marilyn Horne Song Competition. The tour has taken her to cities in California, Texas, and New York.

Ms. Bradley begins her contract with the Metropolitan Opera on September 8, 2015. Ms. Bradley received her master of music degree in vocal performance from BGSU in 2009 and studied voice with soprano Myra Merritt.

Also from the studio of Myra Merritt, Elizabeth Hood, who graduated from BGSU in May 2015 has recently completed an operatic training program.  Elizabeth had the chance to sing the demanding role of The Queen of the Night in Mozart’s Die Zauberflöte at the Lyric Opera Studio Weimar this past summer.  The program is an intensive opera training program designed for emerging young professional singers and focuses on the German theatre system. The program consisted of 39 students representing 18 different countries. The students were given master classes and the opportunity to learn a role and sing it with orchestra in Weimar.


Andrew Pelletier in recital tour of the South

Andrew Pelletier, Associate Professor of Horn, will be making a recital tour in the South, this September, with residencies at the University of Southern Mississippi in Hattiesburg (Sept. 7-9), University of West Georgia in Carrollton (Sept. 10-12), and the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa (Sept. 13-15).  Each residency will include masterclasses, lectures, private teaching and a recital.

Benjamin Bacni, 2014 horn alumni, wins major international competition

Benjamin Bacni, a 2014 BGSU alumni and horn student of Andrew Pelletier, has won the First Prize in the 2015 International Horn Competition of America, University Division.  The IHCA is the only internationally-recognized solo competition for the horn in the United States, held every two years.  At the competition, Benjamin also won the Gretchen Snedeker Prize for his performance of Tim Martin’s “Lament for Horn Solo”.