Video Games Helping to Rebuild Historic Landmarks?

by Weston Bensman, BGSU History major. This is one in a series of posts written by students in HIST 4800 in Spring, 2020, putting our world into historical context for the public.

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View of the fire at Notre Dame Cathedral as the historic spire was collapsing (from: https://gulfnews.com/world/europe/should-notre-dames-spire-be-rebuilt-as-it-was-1.63417201)

Recent events have shown that video games may have other uses besides entertainment. In April 2019 Notre Dame cathedral caught fire and the structure was damaged extensively. Immediately after this disaster people in France and around the world called for a restoration and rebuild, but the difficulty of rebuilding the cathedral as close as possible to the original design was quickly realized. One of the biggest questions was whether the spire should be rebuilt after it collapsed during the fire. This is where Assassin’s Creed Unity can help as the creators of Assassins Creed attempt to be as historically accurate as possible when designing their games including architecture.   

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Another Way to Find the Past?: DNA Testing

by Jack Riegert, BGSU History major. This is one in a series of posts written by students in HIST 4800 in Spring, 2020, putting our world into historical context for the public.

While the thrill of local and world history can be one hell of a goose-chase, genealogy DNA test kits are growing to be a popular medium for people to pursue this. Genealogy isn’t just a study of the run of the mill tax records or census records; being in the 21stcentury DNA testing is a new way to try to get an accurate analysis of your family’s history!  In the past five years, the growing industry of genealogy welcomed many new businesses and startups into the industry, businesses like 23andMe and Ancestry being the two largest. America is the melting pot, and most people have a general idea where their family comes from, sometimes indicated by last name, oral history, and skin color. 

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Fear and Racism: COVID-19 and WWII

by Anne Mier, BGSU History major. This is one in a series of posts written by students in HIST 4800 in Spring, 2020, putting our world into historical context for the public.

I am not a VIRUS for anti-racism, bullying, and hate in the outbreak situation of Coronavirus 2019 infection or Covid-19 (source)

COVID-19 has been a stressful and scary time for a lot of people because their entire lives have been practically taken away from them. This virus is different from others because it can infect anyone, so there is no avoiding it.  In a time like this, it can be easy to put the blame on someone or a particular group. Especially when the first cases were being diagnosed and there wasn’t a lot of information, it was easy to jump to conclusions. Rather than blaming those who aren’t following the rules of social distancing, a lot of people have been blaming Chinese people or anyone that is perceived to be Asian for being the source of the virus.

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Farewell to Dr. T DeWayne Moore

 With the end of the spring semester, the History Department bids a fond farewell to Dr. T. DeWayne Moore, a Visiting Assistant Teaching Professor who taught for the Department during the 2019/2020 academic year.  DeWayne specializes in African American, 20th-century, and public history.  The Department was fortunate to have him on the faculty, if only for a year. 

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COVID-19 and the 1918 Influenza Pandemic

by Brendan Battle, BGSU History major. This is one in a series of posts written by students in HIST 4800 in Spring, 2020, putting our world into historical context for the public.

American Response to Epidemics: Compare and Contrast

            The United States and the world are in the midst of the worst international pandemic in generations, the COVID-19 novel coronavirus. The virus has claimed tens of thousands of lives and transformed everyday life as people, governments, and businesses struggle to respond to the highly virulent and deadly disease. However, this is not the first time the nation has been locked down by disease, with similar events occurring due to the 1918 influenza pandemic, popularly known as the “Spanish Flu.” The virus is estimated to have infected roughly five hundred million people, nearly a third of the world’s population at the time and claimed the lives of more than fifty million people, with over 500,000 of those deaths occurring in the United States.[1] Responses to both pandemics show weaknesses in our social systems and a conflict between interests of public safety and economic and political goals. The measures taken by our national, state, and city governments in response to our current pandemic show close similarities in both the successes and failures over one hundred years apart.

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Studying History during the Covid-19 Pandemic

The coronavirus pandemic and accompanying shutdown of schools, colleges and universities required a rapid transition of face-to-face courses to online offerings. History faculty adapted quickly and well, changing syllabi, assignments, and course activities. Here are some images of how History faculty and students adapted to unprecedented circumstances.

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Historiography: A Prize-Winning Course

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Historiography: A Prize-Winning Course!

Dr. Matt Schumann, history students Ms. Haley Hoffman and Mr. Nick Bowers, and AYA student Ms. Olivia Johnson won the Elliott L. Blinn Award for Faculty / Undergraduate Basic Research for 2020. The prize will be given officially at the Faculty Awards Ceremony on April 6. In giving this award, the university substantially recognizes both the ongoing history research of all three students, and Dr. Schumann’s scholarship on course design for the class in which the students’ research got its start: HIST 3790: Historiography. Continue reading

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