Category Archives: Uncategorized

Obamacare is almost here!

Thanks to Carol Singer, out librarian for government collections, for providing the information below!

As part of the Affordable Care Act, a health care exchange will be available on October 1, 2013. This health care exchange allows U.S. citizens and legal residents to purchase the subsidized health insurance coverage they are required to have by January 1, 2014.

The U.S. government’s official web site for the Affordable Care Act is HealthCare.gov:

https://www.healthcare.gov/ Their YouTube channel http://www.youtube.com/user/HealthCareGov/videos also provides useful information.

For a quick, 7-minute introduction, you can watch the YouToons Get Ready for Obamacare: http://kff.org/health-reform/video/youtoons-obamacare-video/

If you need to apply for insurance, you may apply via mail, their toll-free phone number (1-800-318-2596), the HealthCare.gov web site, or by using a certified navigator or other person who is trained to assist you in finding and applying for this insurance. A list of certified navigators for Ohio is available from the State Library of Ohio at:

http://library.ohio.gov/sites/default/files/Navigator%20Grant%20Recipients%20-%20OHIO.pdf

To get a list of local agencies that can help you find information about this mandated insurance and also help you apply for the insurance, go to https://localhelp.healthcare.gov/ and enter your zip code in the search box.

Many private and governmental organizations have produced information about the Affordable Care Act, such as:

Consumer Reports: http://www.consumerreports.org/health/resources/pdf/ncqa/The_Affordable_Care_Act-You_and_Your_Family.pdf

The AARP (American Association of Retired Persons): http://www.aarp.org/health/health-care-reform/health_reform_factsheets/

The Kaiser Family Foundation has a subsidy calculator: http://kff.org/interactive/subsidy-calculator/

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: http://www.hhs.gov/healthcare/facts/timeline/index.html

WebMD: http://www.webmd.com/health-insurance/default.htm

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: http://www.va.gov/health/aca/

Medicaid: http://www.medicaid.gov/affordablecareact/affordable-care-act.html

Medicare: http://www.medicare.gov/about-us/affordable-care-act/affordable-care-act.html

U.S. Small Business Administration: http://www.sba.gov/healthcare

Popular Music Controversies – Brown Bag Lunch Series

Please join the Friends of University Libraries for a Brown Bag Lunch from 11:30 am on Thursday, September 26 in the Pallister Conference Room featuring Dr. Matt Donahue. In recognition of Banned Books Week, Donahue will give a presentation on Popular Music Controversies: The Ascent From Low Culture to High Culture.

Since the early days of rock and roll in the 1950s to its many subgenres in the present day there has been moments of popular music controversy.  Rock and roll music’s rise in the 1950s, was met by both avid fans, as well as detractors to the musical style and this phenomenon continues still to this day with genres of music that have since developed including heavy metal, punk rock and rap.  Seemingly with every decade and subgenres of popular music that have risen since rock and roll’s rise in the 1950s, there has been controversy.  This presentation will highlight some of the controversies surrounding rock and roll and various subgenres from the 1950s to the present.  In addition to examining some of the controversies surrounding rock and roll and its many subgenres, this presentation will also examine how certain popular music styles have gone from being labeled as low culture and being banned to being celebrated and embraced by so called “high culture” institutions such as museums and universities.

Dr. Matthew Donahue is a lecturer in the Department of Popular Culture at Bowling Green State University, teaching a variety of courses related to popular music and popular culture.  In addition he is a recognized musician, artist, filmmaker and writer.

Jerome Library loves you

We know the start of the new school year can feel overwhelming, with so many new faces and places and things to get done! So let us help you. Like the University Libraries on Facebook or follow us on Twitter, and you will have no problem staying current with what’s new here, or knowing how to reach us when you need us. You’ll be the first to know when the elevators are finally finished and when we’re bringing out the popcorn machine, as well as when we get a new collection of scholarly, full-text geoscience journals (hint: keep your eyes out for an announcement on that one this week!).

We also Flickr and YouTube, in case you didn’t know.

UL Receives Institute of Museum and Library Services Grant

 

The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) announced that the University Libraries received $21,000 of non-federal funds as part of the Sparks! Ignition Grants.

“Sparks! Ignition Grants are designed to help libraries and museums solve challenging problems,” said Susan Hildreth, IMLS Director. “They promote creativity and innovation by supporting promising new approaches to issues affecting libraries and museums across the country. This grant program has tremendous potential to turn small investments of funds into nationally significant projects.”

The University Libraries will produce videos and text records using visual identification, demonstration, dramatization, and expert commentary to interpret non-textual items in its Special Collections that are impossible or difficult to digitize. The videos will be linked to the online catalog as part of the standard record and uploaded to YouTube. The project team will evaluate whether such “enacted metadata” helps users find materials relevant to their research, and whether it promotes increased use of special collections among scholars, faculty, and students. Examples of some of the objects to be addressed in the videos and recordings include action figures, diaries, the jukebox, magazines, and other objects that illustrate teen culture.

The Institute of Museum and Library Services is the primary source of federal support for the nation’s 123,000 libraries and 17,500 museums. Through grant making, policy development, and research, IMLS helps communities and individuals thrive through broad public access to knowledge, cultural heritage, and lifelong learning. To learn more about IMLS, please visit www.imls.gov.

ProQuest database maintenance 6/30

Due to scheduled vendor maintenance, the following ProQuest databases will be unavailable from 10:00pm on Saturday, June 30, to 10:00am on Sunday, July 1.

  • American Periodicals Series Online
  • Dissertations & Theses
  • Ethnic NewsWatch
  • GenderWatch
  • Linguistics & Language Behavior Abstracts (LLBA)
  • New York Times Historical
  • Physical Education Index
  • Vogue Archive
  • World News Connection

Get a $15 gift card and help the Libraries!

Bathing caps imageThe BGSU Libraries are seeking undergraduate students to participate in a study to help us improve our website.

Participants will be asked to give their opinions about some individual pages on the Libraries’ website and also use the site to answer some questions.

The study should take about one hour, and volunteers will receive a $15 gift card for their participation. If you would like to be involved, please call or e mail the Research & Information Desk to make an appointment: 419.372.6943 / libhelp@bgsu.edu

 

Friends of the University Libraries Give Staff Award

Lisa Tatham, a 15 year employee of the University Libraries, was the recipient of the Friends of the University Libraries 2011 Staff Award.

The Friends Staff Award is a $500 internal award granted annually to honor a UL staff member (administrative, classified, or faculty) who has made exceptionally valuable contributions to the growth and development of the UL.  Dean Sara Bushong presented Lisa with the award at the University Libraries Opening Day staff meeting.

All new ProQuest interface

Jorge Posada in Hispanic MagazineThis week, the library switched to the all new ProQuest interface!

Seven databases got a new look:

The new interface includes streamlined searching with autocomplete, subject browsing, and the ability to easily narrow your search by source or document type (scholarly articles, for example), date, location, or feature (articles that include images, for example). See ProQuest’s Quick Start reference overview (pdf) for more information.