Category Archives: Fall 2004

University Libraries Celebrate Dr. Janet Parks’ Retirement and Gift

Dr. Janet Parks, Distinguished Teaching Professor in Human Movement, Sport, and Leisure Studies retired in 2004 from a 39-year teaching career at Bowling Green State University. Touched by the countless meaningful relationships she enjoyed with students and other members of the BGSU community, Janet chose to express her appreciation through a gift to the patrons of the University Libraries. She believed they would benefit as she had from the quality resources and services the Libraries offer. On August 21, 2004, a retirement celebration was held in the William T. Jerome Library to honor Janet and launch her project to raise funds for the construction of student group study spaces and a cyber café on the seventh floor of the Jerome Library building. Janet made a personal gift of $20,000 toward the estimated cost of $40,000 to design and construct two group study spaces (Phase I of the project). Her decision was guided by information she received from Dean of University Libraries Dr. Lorraine Haricombe that students had expressed a strong desire to have space in the William T. Jerome Library where small groups could work together. Students not only will enjoy the space, but also will design and construct the space. In consultation with Assistant Professor Lori Young in the School of Art Graphic Design program, students presented design proposals for subdividing the seventh floor into activity zones beginning with a welcoming, high activity social area where the café will be located, opening into a commons area with casual, comfortable seating, research stations, and small group meeting spaces, and finally leading to the quiet study spaces, including the two enclosed group study rooms. Completion of Phase I, construction of both group study rooms, is planned for April 2005.

Dr. Janet Parks has made a tremendous difference in the lives of BGSU students. Together Janet and her friends have raised more than $45,000, including Janet’s personal gift of $20,000, to fund Phase I of the project. To partner with Janet and her friends in their effort to realize Phase II, construction of the cyber café, please consider making a gift to the Janet Parks Library Fund through the BGSU Foundation, Inc., Mileti Alumni Center, BGSU, Bowling Green, Ohio 43403. Your gift will count toward the BGSU Family Campaign.

Beverly Stearns, Director of Administrative Programs & Services University Libraries

Experience the Uncommon: The Common Reading Experience

Imagine this scenario: two students, one a biology major and the other an education major in the hallway of a residence hall deeply engaged in a discussion about a book they have both read. Because of the Common Reading Experience (CRE), this scenario really happens for many first year students at BGSU. Public libraries and Oprah are more likely catalysts for book discussions, but through their strong commitment to reading literacy a small group of devoted faculty, staff, and students at the University have launched the CRE to encourage reading beyond traditional textbooks, regardless of a student’s academic pursuits. Each December the group begins their reading selection process for the following fall by reviewing piles of books for just the right title that would appeal to an 18 year old: one that is engaging, reader friendly, and relevant to modern day issues.

Initiated as a pilot in 2001 with 450 participating students, the CRE has since grown to include approximately 2500 students. The goal of the committee is to engage all incoming first year students in the reading experience, a likely prospect given the expectation that all students will enroll in a BGX values course in Fall 2005. Even though intended as a program for first year students, the CRE selection is catching on with upper class students, other BGSU community members, and area high school students. In addition to selecting the read, the committee organizes a variety of campus events from panel discussions or theater productions to author visits. For example, this fall students read The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien. The author visited campus in October and delivered a riveting talk to a standing-room-only crowd, reaching approximately 1200 faculty, staff, students, and community members.

If you are interested in getting involved with the CRE or recommending a book for the committee’s consideration, contact the CRE committee chair and First Year Experience Librarian, Colleen Boff by phone at 419-372-7901 or by email at cboff@bgnet.bgsu.edu.

Colleen Boff, First Year Experience Librarian

Naxos Music Library: New Access to Streaming Audio

University Libraries have collaborated with more than 40 OhioLINK libraries to make available access to Naxos Music Library‘s streaming audio service. The libraries have joined to establish more than 250 simultaneous logins that are accessible to patrons at participating institutions. Naxos Music Library has been available to the BGSU community on-campus since mid-October; off-campus access will be available in the near future. Although not a replacement for a tangible collection of recordings, Naxos Music Library offers the BGSU community an additional venue for accessing recorded sound. Initial responses, from several music graduate students and library staff, are overwhelmingly positive.

A project of Naxos Music, the online resource includes all recordings issued on the Naxos and Marco Polo labels, as well as content licensed from other companies, including Celestial Harmonies, First Edition, and more. Users may choose several streaming rates depending on the capacity of their internet connections. Specific recordings may be accessed by general browsing, browsing by genre, and by using an advanced search interface. In addition to the sound files, program and biographical notes are available online.

Bonna Boettcher, Chair, Archival Collections and Branches and Head Librarian, Music Library & Sound Recordings Archives

Dictionary of National Biography Updated

University Libraries have purchased the new Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (ODNB), a 60-volume encyclopedia that includes biographies for 50,000 men and women who have been connected with the British Isles. Only people who died before January 1, 2001 are eligible for inclusion in this reference work. The ODNB is an update to the venerable Dictionary of National Biography (DNB), which was completed in 1900, with supplements over the next 90 years. Biographies for the 39,000 people from the DNB are included in this new reference work, but all articles from the DNB have been revised.

With this purchase, University Libraries also provide access to the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography Online for two years. The database includes the text of both the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography and the Dictionary of National Biography. A wide variety of searches are available, including personal names, field of interest, religious affiliation, and keywords.

The original Dictionary of National Biography was a product of the Victorian Era. The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography is, to use the words of Tim Rosenthal in the Sunday Times, “Dead juicy: a history of great Britons with all the dirty bits.” In addition to a more open attitude about sex, the editors have included biographies for the infamous and the bizarre, creating a certain amount of controversy. Some families of murder victims have protested the inclusion of well-known murderers. An example of individuals included under this new editorial policy is Mary Toft, who gave birth to 17 rabbits. A review in the London Independent said, “It is for its endless capacity for capturing the eccentric and unusual that the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography will ultimately win its place in the affections of readers.”

The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography Online research database is available at the University Libraries Main Research Databases page: http://maurice.bgsu.edu/search/y.

Carol Singer, Reference and Instruction Librarian and Interim Co-Coordinator of Reference Services

“All the News That’s Fit To Print”

University Libraries now provide access to the full text, digitized New York Times 1851-2001. This new database will be useful to students and faculty in many disciplines, in addition to offering a fascinating look at the world during this 150 year period. Whether you seek information on Sitting Bull or bull markets, Woodstock or summer stock, Ford Motor or Francis Ford Coppola, you’ll find it in the New York Times.

Not only are full text images available for articles, advertisements, comics and cartoons, editorials, book/film/theater/concert reviews, photos, maps, etc., but also these images are searchable, even the ads and picture captions. Because this is an archival database, text for the most current several years is not included. Each year another year is added to the database, so that next year the database will include entries for 2002.

The LexisNexis Academic research database provides full text of more recent New York Times articles, but does not include any visuals such as tables, photos, editorial cartoons, advertisements, etc.

Both databases are available for on-campus and off-campus access via the University Libraries Main Research Databases page: http://maurice.bgsu.edu/search/y.

Carol Singer, Reference and Instruction Librarian and Interim Co-Coordinator of Reference Services

“All the News That’s Fit To Print”

University Libraries now provide access to the full text, digitized New York Times 1851-2001. This new database will be useful to students and faculty in many disciplines, in addition to offering a fascinating look at the world during this 150 year period. Whether you seek information on Sitting Bull or bull markets, Woodstock or summer stock, Ford Motor or Francis Ford Coppola, you’ll find it in the New York Times.

Not only are full text images available for articles, advertisements, comics and cartoons, editorials, book/film/theater/concert reviews, photos, maps, etc., but also these images are searchable, even the ads and picture captions. Because this is an archival database, text for the most current several years is not included. Each year another year is added to the database, so that next year the database will include entries for 2002.

The LexisNexis Academic research database provides full text of more recent New York Times articles, but does not include any visuals such as tables, photos, editorial cartoons, advertisements, etc.

Both databases are available for on-campus and off-campus access via the University Libraries Main Research Databases page: http://maurice.bgsu.edu/search/y.

Carol Singer, Reference and Instruction Librarian and Interim Co-Coordinator of Reference Services

“All the News That’s Fit To Print”

University Libraries now provide access to the full text, digitized New York Times 1851-2001. This new database will be useful to students and faculty in many disciplines, in addition to offering a fascinating look at the world during this 150 year period. Whether you seek information on Sitting Bull or bull markets, Woodstock or summer stock, Ford Motor or Francis Ford Coppola, you’ll find it in the New York Times.

Not only are full text images available for articles, advertisements, comics and cartoons, editorials, book/film/theater/concert reviews, photos, maps, etc., but also these images are searchable, even the ads and picture captions. Because this is an archival database, text for the most current several years is not included. Each year another year is added to the database, so that next year the database will include entries for 2002.

The LexisNexis Academic research database provides full text of more recent New York Times articles, but does not include any visuals such as tables, photos, editorial cartoons, advertisements, etc.

Both databases are available for on-campus and off-campus access via the University Libraries Main Research Databases page: http://maurice.bgsu.edu/search/y.

Carol Singer, Reference and Instruction Librarian and Interim Co-Coordinator of Reference Services

ARTstor: 21st Century Access to Art Work Images

University Libraries now bring art images from the world’s museums to BGSU with ARTstor. ARTstor was founded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation with a mission to use digital technology to enhance scholarship, teaching, and learning in the arts and associated fields. This image database contains collections of hundreds of thousands of digital images with related scholarly information. Major initial collections include the Carnegie Arts of the United States Collection, the Huntington Archive of Asian Art, the Illustrated Bartsch, the Mellon International Dunhuang Archive (MIDA), and the Museum of Modern Art Architecture and Design Collection. ARTstor also includes the Art Museum Image Consortium (AMICO) collection that was formerly part of the OhioLINK Digital Media Center Art and Architecture collection. ARTstor further provides a means for faculty to contribute their own images to the database to increase access for other scholars and students.

In early 2004, at the suggestion of Andrew Hershberger, Assistant Professor of Contemporary Art History and other faculty in the School of Art, BGSU Libraries became part of the beta test of ARTstor. The test period provided an opportunity for the BGSU community to evaluate the database. Response from faculty and students in many disciplines was very positive and the University Libraries set out to find a way to fund access to the digital image database. Through grant funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities, University Libraries now subscribe and provide access to ARTstor for the BGSU campus and Firelands College.

Digital images are becoming the teaching tool of the future, and increasingly of the present as well. By downloading the ARTstor Viewer, instructors can create offline slide shows for their classes using large high-resolution ARTstor images and incorporating images from other sources. Small images (400 pixels long) can be downloaded without the viewer, and are compatible with the latest versions of Power Point, PhotoShop, and other image editing software. The BGSU community has copyright clearance to use the smaller images for noncommercial, educational purposes such as dissertations or conference presentations. For more information and help creating offline presentations, download ARTstor’s Offline Image Viewer from the Utilities menu and use the context sensitive help.

With ARTstor “instructor privileges,” instructors can set up image groups for students to view outside of class. Students can write comments about the images, and even add images of their own if the instructor chooses. The instructor can also choose to allow students to create their own image group as part of an assignment. Some BGSU faculty members are already taking advantage of these features.

To register for ARTstor instructor privileges, you will need an authorization code and password. Contact the Jerome Library reference desk at 419-372-6943 or libhelp@bgnet.bgsu.edu for this information. Visit ARTstor http://www.artstor.org.

Linda A. Brown, Coordinator of Collections
Julie L. Rabine, Interim Acquisitions Coordinator

PLoS: The Newest Initiative in the Scholarly Communication Movement

Public Library of Science (PLoS) publishes two open-access journals: PLoS Biology and PLoS Medicine. In their mission statement, PLoS commits their organization “… to making the world’s scientific and medical literature a public resource.” By publishing freely available peer-reviewed research in their two online journals, PLoS allows the full text of the newest scientific information to be searched by anyone with access to the Internet. PLoS is the newest initiative in the scholarly communication movement, which includes other organizations dedicated to changing the traditional publication model.

PLoS journals are free to the user, but authors whose peer-reviewed articles have been accepted pay a publication fee. OhioLINK, the statewide library consortium, is offering to reimburse half of this publication fee for researchers at member institutions. Tom Sanville, Executive Director of OhioLINK, stated “The OhioLINK community considers it essential that open access and other innovations in scholarly communication are given a chance to be evaluated and adopted if successful. By supporting PLoS, we can foster faculty publication through a potentially more cost effective means, while simultaneously maximizing access to their research.”

University Libraries participate in this program as an OhioLINK member institution. Faculty and students who have articles accepted by PLoS Biology or PLoS Medicine qualify for this reimbursement. For more information contact Robin Sinn at Ogg Science Library by phone at 419-372-9239 or by email at rsinn@bgnet.bgsu.edu.

Coleen Parmer, Chair, Collections and Technical Services and Head Librarian, Government Documents
Robin Sinn, Head Librarian, Science Library