Category Archives: General

Are you looking for some fun Halloween reading?

Are you in the Halloween mood? Well, we have a lot of good books to satisfy those looking for good Halloween reads!  Below are just a few of the books we offer here in Jerome Library:

 

TV Horror

 

 

 

Halloween: From Pagan Ritual to Party Night

 

 

 

 

Halloween Customs, Recipes, & Spells

 

 

 

Haunted House Halloween Handbook

 

 

 


A History of Horror

 

 

For even more spooky reads, go to the OhioLINK catalog and search for Halloween!

 

 

 

Extended Hours Now Offered

Extended Hours have been announced! The University Libraries is excited to offer extended hours (until 2:00 am Sunday-Thursday) beginning on Monday, October 14. Circulation services as well as access to our laptops, headphones, and reserve materials will be available as usual.  The first floor of the Wm. T. Jerome Library along with the ITS labs will remain open until 2:00 am. Library patrons will not have access to the special collections or to services within the Learning Commons after midnight. The Wm. T. Jerome Library offers more than 200 computers, quiet study space throughout the building, and many group study locations. For more information about our hours, visit http://ul2.bgsu.edu/hours.

Looking for Information on Safe Rooms?

Tornado season is here again. Are you thinking about building a safe room? The Federal Emergency Management Agency provides guidance on constructing safe rooms in homes, community centers, and schools. They explain how to determine if you need a safe room, how to plan a safe room and even provide a list of design drawings.  The main FEMA safe room page is:

http://www.fema.gov/safe-rooms

Helpful documents include:

Taking Shelter from the Storm: Building a Safe Room for Your Home or Small Business:

http://www.fema.gov/site-page/fema-320-taking-shelter-storm-building-safe-room-your-home-or-small-business

The drawings referenced in this publication are also available online:

http://www.fema.gov/library/viewRecord.do?id=5788

Design and Construction Guidance for Community Safe Rooms is available at:

http://www.fema.gov/library/viewRecord.do?id=1657

University Libraries own several FEMA CD-ROMs on the planning and construction of safe rooms. They are available in the Government Documents collection:

Design and Construction Guidance for Community Safe Rooms can be found at HS 5.120:SA1/2/CD

Taking Shelter from the Storm: Building a Safe Room Inside Your House is at HS 5.120:SH4/2008/CD

Jerome Library Loves You

How does Jerome Library love you? Let us count the ways!

  • Almost 60 librarians and staff
  • 150 + computers
  • 800 seats to sit, study, and read
  • 716,000 + sound recordings
  • 70,000 + e-journals
  • 100 hours a week the building is open
  • 2.7 million volumes
  • 74,000 + e-books
  • 8 floors
  • 10 Kindles
  • 5 iPads

Show University Libraries some love this Valentine’s Day and come see what we have to offer!

Spotlight on Black Fashion Models and Designers for Black History Month

As you may know, February is Black History Month and we are shining a spotlight on African American fashion designers and models! What better way to celebrate and pay tribute than by using library resources?

The Vogue Archive is one of the many database to which you can get access through the University Libraries Home Page. In it are all of the issues of the popular fashion magazine, Vogue. The archive covers from 1892 when the magazine was created to the current issue. With the Vogue Archives, you can search by photographer, model, designer, company/brand, feature type, etc.

African American fashion designers have created an indelible footprint on the fashion industry. Among the notable names in fashion design is Tracy Reece, who has designed pieces worn by Michelle Obama. Pictured below is an advertisement from the Vogue Archives of some of Reese’s designs. For more information on Tracy Reese, read this article from New African Woman magazine: http://search.proquest.com/docview/1283332398?accountid=26417

 

Another famous name in fashion is Beverly Johnson. She made history in 1974 when she was the first black woman to appear on the cover of Vogue.

Tyra Banks is one of the most recognizable supermodels today, and she has been photographed for Vogue numerous times.

 

Supermodel Naomi Campbell

This February, take the time to reflect on how far America has come! Remember  that beauty comes in every color and size.  Also, don’t forget to check out the Vogue Archive database, available through BGSU.

To access the Vogue Archive, go to the BGSU Libraries Home Page, and click on “All Databases” on the left side of the page. Then click on “V”  under “Databases A-Z” and scroll down to Vogue Archive. Click “Connect” and you’re ready to explore!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:

Advertisement: Amazon fashion (amazon). (2012, Vogue, 202, 188-188, 189. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/1220559835?accountid=26417

Cover: Vogue. (1974, Aug 01). Vogue, 164, C1. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/879280023?accountid=26417

Cover: Vogue. (1993, Jun 01). Vogue, 183, C1. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/879290434?accountid=26417

Fashion: Tall. (2002, Apr 01). Vogue, 192, 302-302, 303. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/879315155?accountid=26417

Meet the designer of that dress. (2012, New African Woman, , 14-15. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/1283332398?accountid=26417

Higher Education Funding in Ohio

Governor Kasich has issued the biennial budget for 2014-2015. The budget documents are linked from: http://jobsbudget.ohio.gov/

Although other budget documents include information about funding higher education, the greatest amount of information on higher education funding is on pages 54-61 of the Reforms Book, http://jobsbudget.ohio.gov/budget/Reforms_14-15.pdf

This Transforming Higher Education chapter explains why and how the formula for the State Share of Instruction (SSI) is changing. Highlights of the changes for the formula used for state universities in 2014 include:

  • Eliminate the Stop Loss
  • Eliminate Historical Set Asides
  • Adopt a Standard Three-Year Average

Changes to be implemented in 2015 include:

  • Proportional Credit for Transfer Students
  • Apply At-Risk Weights at the Student Level
  • Remove the Separate Funding Formula for Regional Campuses
  • Change Treatment of Out-of-State Undergraduates
  • Award Credit for Associate Degrees

To see projections of how these formula changes will affect the SSI for Bowling Green State University and other public colleges and universities see:

Campus-by-Campus Projection of State Share of Instruction (SSI) Dollars for Fiscal Year 2014

https://www.ohiohighered.org/sites/ohiohighered.org/files/uploads/data/reports/SSI.FY14.Projection.02.07.13.pdf

Background information on this new formula for funding higher education in Ohio is available in the Ohio Higher Education Funding Commission Report:

https://www.ohiohighered.org/sites/ohiohighered.org/files/uploads/financial/ssi/Ohio%20Higher%20Education%20Funding%20Commission%20-%20Report.pdf

Additional information about this Commission is found on their Web site at:

http://regents.ohio.gov/financial/hefc/index.php

Preliminary Data Items Now Available in MathSciNet

From the American Mathematical Society:

MathSciNet now includes Preliminary Data items, which are created from bibliographic data received directly from publishers. This data allows users to view early information about new papers in mathematics while full processing, including author identification and editorial decisions, is ongoing.

Preliminary Data items are marked as such until processing is complete. The initial group of publishers who have agreed to provide preliminary data feeds includes the American Mathematical Society, the Canadian Mathematical Society, the European Mathematical Society, the Mathematical Association of America, SIAM, Elsevier, and Springer. Publishers interested in participating in the Preliminary Data program are invited to contact: mr-librarian@ams.org.

In addition, new MathSciNet item tags allow users to instantly assess at what stage an item is in the review process. The seven tags are: Preliminary Data, Pending, Reviewed, Expansion, DML, Indexed, and Thesis. For more information and detailed descriptions of each item tag, please visit: www.ams.org/mathscinet/help/fullitem_help_full.html.

Do you read banned books?

In 2010-2011, at least 46 books were challenged or banned in schools and libraries across the United States, from classics like The Diary of Anne Frank and The Catcher in the Rye to newly popular titles like The Hunger Games and Perks of Being a Wallflower.

Libraries have long been champions against censorship and promoters of the freedom to read. We believe library users should have access to books that represent a range of ideas and viewpoints and should be able to read them without fear of harassment or reprisal.

This week is Banned Books Week across the country. Which banned books have you read? Check out the American Library Association’s lists of challenged titles going back to 2004, and remember to thank a librarian!

Image reprinted with the permission of the American Library Association.