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BGSU University Libraries News

‘Orange is the New Black’ Author Speaks at BGSU

January 10th, 2017 · No Comments · Events

This fall, the University Libraries was honored to present the fourth speaker in our lecture series Ordinary People, Extraordinary Stories featuring Piper Kerman, best-selling author of “Orange is the New Black: My Year in a Women’s Prison.”

 Her book chronicles the author’s 13 months spent in the Federal Correctional Institution in Danbury, Connecticut. In her compelling, moving and often hilarious book, she explores the experience of incarceration and the intersection of her life with the lives of the women she met while in prison: their friendships and families, mental illnesses and substance abuse issues, cliques and codes of behavior. The memoir was adapted into a critically-acclaimed Netflix original series of the same name by Jenji Kohan. The Emmy and Peabody Award-winning show has been called “the best TV show about prison ever made” by The Washington Post.

 While on campus, Kerman took part in a panel discussion on prison reform with faculty members from the College of Health & Human Services. BGSU students were able to hear a variety of perspectives and then take part in an interactive discussion with Kerman. The day concluded with a dinner presentation in which Kerman spoke to over 500 community members about her experience.

 

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Welcome Back Falcons

January 6th, 2017 · No Comments · General, News

After a long and restful winter break, University Libraries is back and excited to greet the Spring semester…even if it is below freezing outside.

The William T. Jerome library will be open the following hours during Spring 2017 semester (January 9-April 22). Extended hours begin Sunday, April 23.

Monday-Thursday                         8:00 a.m.-2:00 a.m.
Friday                                                 8:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m.

Saturday                                           10:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m
Sunday                                              12:00 p.m.-2:00 a.m.

Additional information and exceptions can be found on the Library Hours webpage.

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Some services unavailable Dec. 30

December 20th, 2016 · No Comments · Service Alert

Friday, December 30, Find It (360 Link) and the Journals by Title list will be unavailable from 8-9pm.

During this downtime, users will be able to find holdings of full-text ejournals and link to full text by using the catalog or BrowZine.

Summon will be available. Full text links from Summon will work correctly if they are direct links. Most significant sources of full text use direct-linking from Summon, including JSTOR, ScienceDirect, and most other ejournal publishers. The major providers that do NOT use direct-linking are EBSCO and the OhioLINK EJC. Therefore, full text links from Summon to EBSCO and the EJC, as well as some other providers that use openURL linking, will NOT work during this period, and users will see an error message.

The “Find It!” button will not work during this period.

The Journals by Title list will not be available during this period.

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Winter Break Hours

December 16th, 2016 · No Comments · Events, News

The staff of the University Libraries wishes you a happy and safe holiday season! Please keep in mind that the Library and Learning Commons has curtailed hours during the winter break:

Wm. T. Jerome Library Building Hours

Friday, December 16 12:01 am – 6:00 pm
Saturday, December 17 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Sunday, December 18 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Monday, December 19 – Friday, December 23 8:00 am – 6:00 pm
Saturday, December 24 CLOSED
Sunday, December 25 CLOSED
Monday, December 26 CLOSED
Tuesday, December 27 CLOSED
Wednesday, December 28 8:00 am – 6:00 pm
Thursday, December 29 8:00 am – 6:00 pm
Friday, December 30 8:00 am – 6:00 pm
Saturday, December 31 CLOSED
Sunday, January 1 CLOSED
Monday, January 2 CLOSED
Tuesday, January 3 8:00 am – 6:00 pm
Wednesday, January 4 8:00 am – 6:00 pm
Thursday, January 5 8:00 am – 6:00 pm
Friday, January 6 8:00 am – 6:00 pm
Saturday, January 7 1:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Sunday, January 8 1:00 pm – 10:00 pm

For a complete list of the Academic Year 2016-2017 hours, including holidays, connect to the following page.

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Explore the Harriette Coret Collection

December 13th, 2016 · No Comments · News, Resources

The Ray and Pat Browne Popular Culture Library is happy to announce that the Harriette Coret Collection is now available for research. This collection donated by Mrs. Coret’s family in August, 2016. Mrs. Coret was a mental health professional, a newspaper columnist, and a family biographer in addition to being a writer of fiction. A finding aid for the collection is available here: https://lib.bgsu.edu/finding_aids/items/show/2623

The bulk of this collection focuses on Mrs. Coret’s work as an author for so-called “true confessions” magazines, with titles like Modern Romances and True Story. Mrs. Coret wrote stories that in some ways related to her work as a mental health professional- troubled teens, abusive relationships, and chronic diseases. The nature of these publications meant that authors were paid for their work, but never received byline credit, since the stories were supposed to be true and anonymous. We are extremely fortunate that Mrs. Coret kept not only her manuscripts but copies of the magazine in which the story appeared. In addition to removing the cloak of anonymity, this gives researchers a chance to understand how these stories might have changed from finished draft to publication.

One of the other highlights of this collection is Mrs. Coret’s biographical stories about residents of the Stratford Court retirement home where she spent nearly 18 years until her death in 2015. These touching stories show Mrs. Coret’s skill as a writer and obvious affection for her subjects, and many of them may serve as the best document of that person’s life.

The  is a wonderful document of the work and life of an unheralded writer who published her work in areas too often uncollected by other archives. We are happy to give Mrs. Coret’s work a home and to make it available to researchers, and thank her family for the opportunity.

 

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Study on Sunday (SOS)

December 5th, 2016 · No Comments · News

Are you stressed out? Need help preparing for finals? Study on Sunday (SOS) is the answer. On Sunday, December 11, the Learning Commons and University Libraries are offering extended hours for drop-in tutoring for math/stats and many subjects, and writing consultations. We’ll also provide therapy dogs, games, snacks and more. For a full list of the drop-in tutoring that will be offered by the Learning Commons, click here Study on Sunday Tutoring and Activities

The Wm. T. Jerome Library will be open all night long so we hope you’ll consider spending your Sunday studying with the University Libraries and the Learning Commons.

In addition, Thinkers Café will be open for extended hours during finals week.  Keep an eye on Twitter for news and updates.  Feel free to tweet out  your thoughts as well! #FinalsSOS

 

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Canvas Commons

December 2nd, 2016 · No Comments · Events, News

Canvas Commons is coming! Do you have a Canvas role of Teacher, Teaching Assistant or Course Designer? Join us for an informational session about Canvas Commons, a new tool that will enable faculty to share learning resources with other users at BGSU and to import learning resources shared to Canvas Commons from hundreds of other institutions. Tuesday, December 6 from 10:00-11:00 or Wednesday, December 7 from 11:30-12:30. Both sessions will be held in the Pallister Conference Room in Jerome Library. Please register here: https://cfebgsu.wufoo.com/forms/w32id9p16x9n1g (hosted by University Libraries and the Center for Faculty Excellence).

 

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Extended Hours (24/5) Begin Sunday, December 4

November 29th, 2016 · No Comments · News, Resources

Need extra time to work on papers and exams? Have your own special spot in the library where you like to study? Need access to books and other library resources? The University Libraries extends its hours of operation (24-5 Sunday through Thursday) beginning Sunday, December 4 provide a safe and comfortable research and study environment free of disruption for our students, staff, and faculty.

Important reminder:  Circulation services as well as access to our laptops, headphones, and reserve materials will be available until 2:00 am.  Library patrons will have access to the 1st, 2nd, 7th and 8th floors throughout the night. Campus Police will be stationed in the library throughout the night to ensure student safety.

The Wm. T. Jerome Library offers more than 200 computers, quiet study space throughout the building, and a variety of collaborative group study locations. To reserve a group study space, click here.

For more information about our hours, visit http://ul2.bgsu.edu/hours.

Best of luck to everyone on their finals!

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Thanksgiving Weekend Hours

November 22nd, 2016 · No Comments · General

Thanksgiving hours begin on Wednesday, November 23 through Sunday, November 27.

  • Wednesday, Nov. 23 – 8AM-6PM
  • Thursday – Friday, Nov. 24-25 – CLOSED
  • Saturday, Nov. 26 – 1-5PM
  • Sunday, Nov. 27– 5PM-2AM

We hope you have an enjoyable and restful Thanksgiving!

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Who can you trust?

November 15th, 2016 · No Comments · Resources

ClawGameBlog350wIn the last several weeks I have heard more and more often about how people are living in “information bubbles.” As a librarian, this concerns me. One of my chief missions is to make high-quality information sources available so students can engage in critical thought bolstered by the best information.

I’m not casting blame: I’ll admit that a few months ago I was getting most of my news through my Facebook feed. But I just got tired of it, so I paid for a subscription to a national newspaper and got more deliberate about reading the weekly magazine I’ve been subscribing to for the last 25 years.

I was struck by the time and effort it takes to stay informed. I think it’s funny how in an age when such an overwhelming amount of information is available we need to make more of a concerted effort to seek out and engage with it, because it’s so easy to only see what shows up in our social media feeds. “Facebook is hosting a huge portion of the political conversation in America,” according to an August article in the New York Times Magazine. 61% of respondents to a 2014 survey of 18-33 year olds said they get news about politics from Facebook. My guess is that number would be higher now. And a lot of what we see there is not quality, fact-based journalism but opinion, conjecture, and outright garbage, making it like the carnival claw game in some ways – fishing around the limited options (much of which is junk), you win whatever’s accessible at the moment, if you win at all.

Like most people, I immerse myself in information from a wide variety of sources of with a wide range of credibility and authority. Some of my choices are clearly based on how easy they are to get to (Wikipedia) and how entertaining I find them (Last Week Tonight with John Oliver). Others are based on my desire for depth, nuance and realism (books and newspapers). There’s nothing wrong with this approach to getting information – what becomes key is how you a) supplement the most accessible and entertaining information, b) evaluate how each source balances bias and authority, and c) sort opinion from fact. Even legitimate and very factual news sources are filled with instances of opinion: cable news has pundits and commentators, and newspapers have editorials and letters. So you must always be an active participant in the evaluation of your own consumption of media. My favorite guide to how to do this comes from the totally non-authoritative site Cracked.com, but you may have also seen Matt Masur’s more recent piece in the Huffington Post, “Bernie Sanders Could Replace President Trump With Little-Known Loophole,” which is NOT about what the title claims at all. 

There are untrustworthy sites that sow misinformation on both the right and the left (the Wall Street Journal’s Blue Feed, Red Feed compellingly demonstrates this) and, fortunately, both Google and Facebook recently announced plans to address this. If you aren’t sure about something, there are plenty of ways to check it out.  When my mom posted this picture to her Facebook account, I turned to snopes.com for a quick fact check. Snopes also has a list of fake news sites, several people have shared this similar Google docs list with me, and FakeNewsWatch.com categorizes sites into fake/hoax news, satire, and clickbait. This is how my colleague Vera proved to me that an old lady in Waco, TX did not actually make coats out of the neighborhood cats’ fur. Thanks, Vera.

The Pulitzer Prize-winning website Politifact is a project of affiliated print newspapers. Journalists fact-check claims made by politicians, public figures and the media and contextualize them. Its associated project PunditFact does the same for members of the media, including columnists, pundits and talk show hosts. You can look at results by person and network, but there aren’t huge numbers of statements in the PunditFact project.

So which news sources should you trust? Pew Center research shows that there is definitely an ideological divide, but many mainstream media outlets are “more trusted than distrusted.” These include the New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, and USA Today. Each of these has ethical guidelines you can read on the American Society of News Editors (ASNE) website (look for USA Today under “Gannett”). These include principles like “Seek Truth,” “Minimize Harm,” and “Be Accountable.” As a member of a profession with its own code of ethics that my colleagues and I take very seriously, the proclamation of these values is something I find reassuring.

Students can get free subscriptions to the Washington Post using their .edu email address, so there is no excuse not to check out this “more trusted” source of news. Students can subscribe to the digital New York Times for $1 a week and the Wall Street Journal for $49 a year, which is a lot of money for a student but could be a reasonable cost for a gift. 

All of these titles are also available in the library databases ProQuest Newsstand and Factiva, though I know it can be cumbersome to link to them there. Most papers let anyone read up to a certain number of articles for free each month, and after you reach your limit you can log in to ProQuest Newsstand and search for the article you want to read. Another option for getting to these titles is to log in to Factiva and then choose “News Pages” at the top. It will take you to a page displaying the front page headlines for 10 international newspapers.

FactivaNewsPages

You can also access news and opinion in the highly-regarded publications Science, Nature, and the Chronicle of Higher Education through the library’s subscriptions. I encourage everyone to install our browser bookmarklet JournalPass, which will let you log in to access these publications (and many more) when you are off campus. (Unfortunately this method will not work for major newspapers because our online access to those does not come directly from the newspaper’s website.)

So give it a try. Up your information game. Learn how to tune out the clickbait and start reading the mainstream sources you may have left behind. Why should you listen to me? Because I’m a librarian, and libraries are still one of the most trusted institutions in the United States. You can trust me.

 

(this post was written by Amy Fry, and you can reach me at afry (at) bgsu.edu)

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