Category Archives: Resources

Take a sneak peak inside the Browne Popular Culture Library

This past spring, Visual Communication Technology student Linda Peralez stopped by the Ray & Pat Browne Library for Popular Culture Studies to film a short documentary. Featuring Head Librarian Nancy Down and Manuscripts & Outreach Archivist Steve Ammidown as well as Department of Popular Culture Lecturer Dr. Charles Coletta, this documentary gives a brief history of the library as well as a glimpse inside its amazing and eclectic collections. Take a peek, and then come see for yourself!

A special thanks to Linda Peralez for allowing us to share her excellent work with you.

Research Appointments Now Available

University Libraries is offering Individual Research Appointments (IRAs) to students. IRAs provide students with the opportunity to work one-on-one with a librarian on a specific research assignment. Students will develop search strategies, identify various print and electronic resources and discover services available in the University Libraries.

IRAs are designed for undergraduate students. (The Libraries offer a similar service for graduate students. Call 2-6943 or stop by the Research & Information Desk for more information.) Students must sign up for appointments by midnight of the day before the requested appointment date to allow for preparation. Students must also have a specific assignment or project and will be asked to state their topic when setting up their appointment.

IRAs are offered Monday-Friday.   To schedule an appointment, call 419-372-6943, or stop by the Research & Information Desk on the first floor of the Jerome Library.

Get to know the new Nexis Uni!

UPDATE 8/30/17: It has come to our attention that all content has not been completely loaded into the new Nexis Uni, and that persistent links to Nexis Uni content are not working and are unlikely to be fixed until October. Links to the old LexisNexis Academic interface have been added to our database records for Nexis Uni, and we encourage all users to wait until later this semester to update permalinks to LexisNexis content.

One of our most popular databases, LexisNexis, has a new look and a new name – Nexis Uni!

However, even though it works a differently and has a different name, it is still one of our most important databases for full-text newspapers and legal and business information.

When you access Nexis Uni, you can search across all content from the big search box at the top of the page.

Nexis Uni search screen

Beneath it you will see options to do a more tailored search limited to news, cases, law reviews, company reviews, or a particular publication. Highlight the different options to see advanced search criteria specific to each. There is also a separate advanced search screen with even more granular options, including the ability to limit by date and content type.

You can filter after you search by many categories, including location (where the source is published), publication type, subject, industry, geography (what area of the world is covered by the content) and more.

Once you find what you are looking for and display the full item, you will see the options to print, email, download (to pdf), save to Google Drive, or search within the document text at the top of the page.

Screenshot showing Nexis Uni options

Users can create a personal account in Nexis Uni to save search settings, searches and documents within the database. Once you are logged in, you can also annotate and save documents. This is a great option for frequent users!

The new interface was released right before the beginning of fall semester, so we are still getting used to it! If you are interested in learning more about it, check out the Nexis Uni tutorials on YouTube, beginning with “How to Search from the Home Page.” You will also find tip sheets and can sign up for training sessions on the Nexis Uni Support & Training website.

Study on Sunday – April 30

Are you stressed out? Need help preparing for finals? Study on Sunday (SOS) is the answer. On Sunday, April 30, the Learning Commons and University Libraries are offering extended hours for drop-in tutoring for math/stats and many subjects, and writing consultations. We’ll also provide therapy dogs, snacks and more. For a full list of the drop-in tutoring that will be offered by the Learning Commons, click here

The Wm. T. Jerome Library will be open all night long so we hope you’ll consider spending your Sunday studying with the University Libraries and the Learning Commons.

In addition, Thinkers Café will be open for extended hours during finals week.  Keep an eye on Twitter for news and updates.  Feel free to tweet out  your thoughts as well! #FinalsSOS

24/5 Hours Begin on April 23

Need extra time to work on papers and exams? Have your own special spot in the library where you like to study? Need access to books and other library resources? The University Libraries extends its hours of operation (24-5 Sunday through Thursday) beginning Sunday, April 23  provide a safe and comfortable research and study environment free of disruption for our students, staff, and faculty.

Important reminder:  Circulation services as well as access to our laptops, headphones, and reserve materials will be available until 2:00 am.  Library patrons will have access to the 1st, 2nd, 7th and 8th floors throughout the night. Campus Police will be stationed in the library throughout the night to ensure student safety.

The Wm. T. Jerome Library offers more than 200 computers, quiet study space throughout the building, and a variety of collaborative group study locations. To reserve a group study space, click here.

For more information about our hours, visit http://ul2.bgsu.edu/hours.

Best of luck to everyone on their finals!

Research Appointments Available

The University Libraries once again offer Individual Research Appointments (IRAs) to students. IRAs provide students with the opportunity to work one-on-one with a librarian on a specific research assignment. Students will develop search strategies, identify various print and electronic resources and discover services available in the University Libraries.

IRAs are designed for undergraduate students. (The Libraries offer a similar service for graduate students. Call 2-6943 or stop by the Research & Information Desk for more information.) Students must sign up for appointments by midnight of the day before the requested appointment date to allow for preparation. Students must also have a specific assignment or project and will be asked to state their topic when setting up their appointment.

IRAs are offered Monday-Friday.   To schedule an appointment, call 419-372-6943, or stop by the Research & Information Desk on the first floor of the Jerome Library.

Independent films on extraordinary African American musicians

To celebrate Black History month, Kanopy is highlighting a selection fo independent films, many exclusive to Kanopy, that showcase the stories of extraordinary African American musicians whose talent has shaped today’s music industry.

Kanopy’s entire Black History Month collection is now available to watch here.

Bayou Maharajah
This film explores the life, times and music of piano legend James Booker, who is described as, “the best black, gay, one-eyed junkie piano genius New Orleans has ever produced.” This roller coaster portrait brings to life the unforgettable story of this amazing musician.
You See Me Laughin’ is a personal journey into the lives and music of the last of the Mississippi hill country bluesmen – farmers and laborers first, musicians second. Musicians who’ve labored for the blues tradition despite lives steeped in poverty and violence.The result is a raw, powerful music.
America’s Blues explores the impact that the Blues has had on our society, our culture, and the entertainment industry. The Blues has influenced nearly every form of American Music and sadly, aside from its part in the birth of Rock and Roll, its influence often goes unrecognized. If music were a color, it would be Blue.
This award-winning documentary tells the untold stories of female jazz and big band instrumentalists and their journeys from the late 30s to the present day. The many first-hand accounts of the challenges faced by these talented women provide a glimpse into decades of racism and sexism that have existed in America.
In the 1970s Roberta Flack became a global sensation. Her style of soulful pop transcended to become the dinner party soundtrack for Middle America. It is a deeply personal story told alongside the wider context of America’s civil rights movement, a struggle that was to strike a chord all over the world.
A tender, revealing documentary about one of the most famous and popular performing artists of the 20th century. Her legendary banana belt dance created theatre history; her song “J’ai deux amours” became a classic, and her hymn. Josephine Baker is portrayed as a true superstar, one with grace and humility.
A musical art form, the American Spiritual, was born out of the folk songs of slaves. Melodies of backbreaking work were sung and passed on throughout the Deep South. Sorrow songs were used to console and transmit secret information. The spirituals have survived generations and continue to inspire all over the world.
This documentary is an intimate look at Tupac Shakur’s life told through never-before-seen footage and interviews with his close friends, revealing an artist who grew up a thug, but one who soon tired of that lifestyle and its trappings, revealing a Tupac far different from the one most of America knows.

By 15 years old, Frank Morgan was an accomplished saxophonist. As his notoriety grew, so did a steady heroin addiction, landing him in and out of jail for over 30 years. The Sound of Redemption offers a frank look into the ups and downs of Morgan’s life and a reflective look at African American culture in 1950s Los Angeles.
This film excavates the hidden sexualities of Black female entertainers who reigned over the nascent blues recording industry of the 1920s. Unlike the male-dominated jazz scene, early blues provided a space for women to take the lead and model an autonomy that was remarkable for women.

Canvas Commons is now LIVE

University Libraries and the Center for Faculty Excellence are pleased to announce that Canvas Commons is now live and located within Canvas via the left global navigation. Commons is a learning object repository that enables educators to find, import, and share resources. A digital library full of educational content, Commons allows Canvas users with the roles of Teacher, Teaching Assistant or Course Designer to share learning resources with other users as well as import learning resources into a Canvas course. To learn more about this tool, visit the resource page on the Center for Faculty Excellence website where you will find an F.A.Q. and a listing of in-person training sessions available during spring semester (http://www.bgsu.edu/center-for-faculty-excellence/find-a-resource/canvas-commons-resources.html ). Training sessions will be held in the Pallister Conference Room on the following dates:

Wednesday, January 18 from 4:00-5:00

Wednesday, January 25 from 11:30 to 12:30

Tuesday, January 31 from 10:00-11:00

Canvas help, including assistance with Commons, is also available during drop-in Faculty Fridays from 1:00-5:00 each week in room 142 of Jerome Library.

Questions about this new service may be directed to Colleen Boff, Associate Dean of UL (cboff@bgsu.edu / 372-7899).

Explore the Harriette Coret Collection

The Ray and Pat Browne Popular Culture Library is happy to announce that the Harriette Coret Collection is now available for research. This collection donated by Mrs. Coret’s family in August, 2016. Mrs. Coret was a mental health professional, a newspaper columnist, and a family biographer in addition to being a writer of fiction. A finding aid for the collection is available here: https://lib.bgsu.edu/finding_aids/items/show/2623

The bulk of this collection focuses on Mrs. Coret’s work as an author for so-called “true confessions” magazines, with titles like Modern Romances and True Story. Mrs. Coret wrote stories that in some ways related to her work as a mental health professional- troubled teens, abusive relationships, and chronic diseases. The nature of these publications meant that authors were paid for their work, but never received byline credit, since the stories were supposed to be true and anonymous. We are extremely fortunate that Mrs. Coret kept not only her manuscripts but copies of the magazine in which the story appeared. In addition to removing the cloak of anonymity, this gives researchers a chance to understand how these stories might have changed from finished draft to publication.

One of the other highlights of this collection is Mrs. Coret’s biographical stories about residents of the Stratford Court retirement home where she spent nearly 18 years until her death in 2015. These touching stories show Mrs. Coret’s skill as a writer and obvious affection for her subjects, and many of them may serve as the best document of that person’s life.

The  is a wonderful document of the work and life of an unheralded writer who published her work in areas too often uncollected by other archives. We are happy to give Mrs. Coret’s work a home and to make it available to researchers, and thank her family for the opportunity.

 

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Extended Hours (24/5) Begin Sunday, December 4

Need extra time to work on papers and exams? Have your own special spot in the library where you like to study? Need access to books and other library resources? The University Libraries extends its hours of operation (24-5 Sunday through Thursday) beginning Sunday, December 4 provide a safe and comfortable research and study environment free of disruption for our students, staff, and faculty.

Important reminder:  Circulation services as well as access to our laptops, headphones, and reserve materials will be available until 2:00 am.  Library patrons will have access to the 1st, 2nd, 7th and 8th floors throughout the night. Campus Police will be stationed in the library throughout the night to ensure student safety.

The Wm. T. Jerome Library offers more than 200 computers, quiet study space throughout the building, and a variety of collaborative group study locations. To reserve a group study space, click here.

For more information about our hours, visit http://ul2.bgsu.edu/hours.

Best of luck to everyone on their finals!