POLICE INTEGRITY LOST

Phil Sinson's Police Integrity Research Group: Research That Matters

The Henry A. Wallace Police Crime Database now available online

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This week we launched The Henry A. Wallace Police Crime Database. It is a publicly available web-based searchable database of nonfederal sworn law enforcement officers who were arrested for one or more crimes during the years 2005 through 2012. The database currently includes summary information on 8,006 criminal arrest cases involving 6,596 individual nonfederal sworn law enforcement officers, each of whom were charged with one or more crimes. The arrested officers were employed by 2,830 state, local, and special law enforcement agencies located in 1,302 counties and independent cities in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Arrest case data are searchable by location that generate heat-maps and also searchable by specific criminal offenses and offense characteristics. The database will be updated periodically, with additional cases added annually. Arrest cases from the year 2013 will be added during Fall 2017. We anticipate adding 2014 arrest data in late 2018, and so on.

Written by Phil Stinson

September 13th, 2017 at 10:37 am

Episode 42 of Police Integrity Lost Podcast Available on iTunes

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Episode 42 of the Police Integrity Lost Podcast – Police Shootings, TASERs, and Police Accountability – is now available for streaming and downloading on iTunes.

Written by Phil Stinson

September 2nd, 2017 at 5:41 pm

Updated Count: Only 30 Police Officers in U.S. Convicted in On-Duty Fatal Shooting Cases since 2005

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There have been 83 nonfederal sworn law enforcement officers with the general powers of arrest (e.g., police officers, deputy sheriffs, state troopers, etc.) who have been arrested for murder or manslaughter resulting from an on-duty shooting where the officer shot and killed someone since the beginning of 2005. Of those 83 officers, to date only 30 have been convicted of a crime resulting from the on-duty shooting (14 by guilty plea, 16 by jury trial, and none by a bench trial).

In the cases where an officer has been convicted, it is often for a lesser offense. Only 5 officers have been convicted of murder (in four of those cases the murder convictions were overturned, but the officers were later convicted of federal crimes arising out of the same incident). As to the other officers, 11 were convicted of manslaughter, 4 were convicted of voluntary manslaughter, 6 were convicted of involuntary manslaughter, 2 were convicted of official misconduct, 1 was convicted of reckless homicide, and 1 was convicted of federal criminal deprivation of civil rights.

The criminal cases for 38 of the officers ended in a non-conviction: 20 were acquitted at a jury trial, 7 were acquitted at a bench trial, 4 were dismissed by a judge, 6 were dismissed by a prosecutor, and in one instance no true bill was returned from a grand jury. The criminal cases for 15 of the officers are still pending today.

Location by state of officers arrested for murder or manslaughter resulting from on-duty shootings:
2 – Alabama
4 – Arkansas
2 – Arizona
3 – California
2 – Colorado
1 – Connecticut
3 – Florida
6 – Georgia
1 – Illinois
1 – Indiana
1 – Kentucky
10 – Louisiana
1 – Maryland
2 – Michigan
1 – Minnesota
3 – Missouri
3 – Mississippi
2 – North Carolina
1 – New Jersey
2 – New Mexico
6 – New York
5 – Ohio
4 – Oklahoma
1 – Pennsylvania
4 – South Carolina
1 – Tennessee
4 – Texas
1 – Utah
4 – Virginia
1 – Washington
1 – Wisconsin

Location by state of officers who were convicted:
1 – Alabama
2 – Arkansas
1 – Arizona
2 – California
1 – Colorado
3 – Georgia
1 – Kentucky
7 – Louisiana
1 – Missouri
1 – New York
3 – Oklahoma
3 – South Carolina
1 – Tennessee
3 – Virginia

Location by state of officers who were not convicted:
2 – Arkansas
1 – Colorado
1 – Connecticut
1 – Florida
1 – Georgia
1 – Indiana
2 – Louisiana
1 – Maryland
2 – Michigan
1 – Minnesota
1 – Missouri
1 – Mississippi
2 – North Carolina
1 – New Jersey
2 – New Mexico
4 – New York
5 – Ohio
1 – Oklahoma
1 – Pennsylvania
1 – South Carolina
2 – Texas
1 – Utah
1 – Virginia
1 – Washington
1 – Wisconsin

Written by Phil Stinson

August 12th, 2017 at 11:17 am

Stinson’s 2005-2011 Police Crime Data Set now available at ICPSR

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The 244 variable data set in Phil Stinson’s study, Study of Sworn Nonfederal Law Enforcement Officers Arrested in the United States, 2005-2011 (ICPSR 35648), was deposited with the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data pursuant to the requirements of NIJ Award No. 2011-IJ-CX-0024. It it available at the Inter-university Consortium of Political & Social Research to qualified university-affiliated researchers as a restricted use data set. For more information, go to http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/35648

Written by Phil Stinson

July 1st, 2017 at 11:32 am

82 Police Officers in United States Charged with Murder or Manslaughter resulting from On-Duty Shootings since 2005

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By my count, since the beginning of 2005, there have been 82 nonfederal sworn law enforcement officers with the general powers of arrest (e.g., police officers, deputy sheriffs, state troopers, etc.) who have been arrested for murder or manslaughter resulting from an on-duty shooting where the officer shot and killed someone. Of those 82 officers, to date only 30 have been convicted of a crime resulting from the on-duty shooting (14 by guilty plea, 16 by jury trial, and none by a bench trial).

In the cases where an officer has been convicted, it is often for a lesser offense. Only 5 officers have been convicted of murder (in four of those cases the murder convictions were overturned, but the officers were later convicted of federal crimes arising out of the same incident). The only officer in this time frame who was convicted of intentional murder and is now in prison is James Ashby (Rocky Ford Police Department in Colorado). As to the other officers, 11 were convicted of manslaughter, 4 were convicted of voluntary manslaughter, 6 were convicted of involuntary manslaughter, 2 were convicted of official misconduct, 1 was convicted of reckless homicide, and 1 was convicted of federal criminal deprivation of civil rights.

The criminal cases for 36 of the officers ended in a non-conviction: 20 were acquitted at a jury trial, 6 were acquitted at a bench trial, 4 were dismissed by a judge, 5 were dismissed by a prosecutor, and in one instance no true bill was returned from a grand jury. The criminal cases for 16 of the officers are still pending today (including Tensing in Ohio).

Out of the 82 officers charged since the beginning of 2005 with murder or manslaughter resulting from an on-duty shooting, the criminal cases have been concluded for 66 of the officers (30 convicted and 36 not convicted).

Written by Phil Stinson

June 28th, 2017 at 6:29 pm

BGSU researchers release report on police crime, schedule webinar to discuss findings

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Two Bowling Green State University researchers recently concluded a National Institute of Justice-funded study on police crime, the report of which will be released by the NIJ June 6, 2016.

The study provides insights into the nature and extent of police crime in the United States, what factors influence how a police organization responds to arrests of officers, and how to foster police integrity by exploring whether police crime and officer arrests correlate with other forms of police misconduct.

Philip Stinson, J.D., Ph.D., and John Liederbach, Ph.D., both associate professors in criminal justice, will share findings from their study in a June 23 webinar, “Police Integrity Lost: A Webinar to Discuss Findings from a Multiyear Study of Law Enforcement Officers Arrested.”

In the course of their research, Stinson and Liederbach analyzed data on 6,724 arrests over a seven-year period (2005-2011). These arrests involved more than 5,500 individual sworn law enforcement officers who were employed by more than 2,500 nonfederal state and local law enforcement agencies located in 1,205 counties and independent cities in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Participants can learn more by registering for the free webinar scheduled for 1 p.m. EDT Thursday, June 23, 2016. Register now at www.bgsu.edu/pilwebinar

The webinar is supported by Award No. 2011-IJ-CX-0024, awarded by the National Institute of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in the webinar are those of the presenters and do not necessarily reflect those of the Department of Justice.

Written by Phil Stinson

May 24th, 2016 at 9:08 am

Officers Charged with an On-Duty Murder or Manslaughter where No Gun was involved

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In the seven year period 2005-2011, we have in our database 48 arrest cases where a nonfederal sworn law enforcement officer was charged with murder or manslaughter resulting from an on-duty incident in which the arrested officer did not shoot someone with a firearm. Of those cases, we are missing conviction data in seven of the arrest cases. In those cases where we have conviction data, 61.0% (n = 25) were convicted, and 39.0% (n = 16) were not convicted. Note that here the unit of analysis is arrest case (and not arrested officer). Eight of the arrested officers (n = 38) had more than one case included in this sample of 48 arrest cases.

Written by Phil Stinson

May 2nd, 2015 at 9:51 am

Posted in Police Crime

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