AWR, pp.226-234

This section of our assigned reading was focused on evaluating sources. It is always important to question your sources whether it be in print or online. Just because something is in print, does not always mean it’s reliable; same goes for internet sources. When evaluating a source you want to check its relevance and the reliability. Ask yourself, does the source’s title address your topic specifically? When was it published? Does the work contain headings? Who is the publisher? Does the work include a bibliography of the works cited? These questions will help to narrow down on whether the source should be used or not. Beyond this, you also want to evaluate a sources arguments. Avoid those that are overly emotional and seem biased; when doing your research you need to evaluate all sides of the issue you’re looking at. The finally checklist this section provides will ultimately reveal if a source should be used or not. CARS is the acronym for checklist (Credible, Accurate, Reasonable, and Supported). You want to make sure the source you found meets all of the above criteria.

I found this reading to be very helpful. Throughout high school and even grade school, “Wikipedia” has been my best friend. What’s scary about that is how anyone can edit the information posted on any given subject. This section really helped me to look for not only more reliable sources but more credible sources as well. I believe through having read this I will be able to find more accurate information for my upcoming paper and furthermore be able to write a stronger paper.

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